Quantcast
Why is the 'International Literacy Day' celebrated? - Answers

Questions answered : 1355||Last updated on : November 19th, 2019 At 09:33am (ET)
Answers » Education » Why is the ‘International Literacy Day’ celebrated?

Why is the ‘International Literacy Day’ celebrated?

World Map depicting nations and their literacy ratesAccording to UNESCO’s Global Monitoring Report on Education for All, “some 775 million adults lack minimum literacy skills, one in five adults are illiterate and 60.7 million children are out-of-school, while many more drop-out or are irregular to school.”

While nearly every individual learns to communicate verbally, not all are fortunate to get in the formal education system. The idea to eradicate illiteracy and create widespread awareness, an International Day dedicated to literacy was first discussed in 1965, during the  ‘World Conference of Ministers of Education’  in Tehran, Iran. The final report of the UNESCO conference stated, “The need for the real emancipation of people and for the increasingly active and productive participation, in the economic, social and political life of human society, of the hundreds of millions of illiterate adults still existing in the world, make it essential to change national education policies.” Hence, on October 26, 1966, the  International Literacy Day  was designated to September 8th.

Despite the advances made towards eradicating illiteracy, the challenges persist in parallel with the demand for skill development. Hence, the theme for 2018 ILD  is:  Literacy and Skill Development.’ The ILD will focus and throw light on the integrated approaches that can support both skill development and dissatisfactory literacy levels, to improve quality of work, life and result in a sustainable and equitable society.

The issue is also part of the UN SDG-4 and 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The SDG-4 aims at obtaining quality education, access to inclusive education that can help equip locals with tools required to develop innovative solutions to the prevailing problems. The 2030 Agenda aims at ensuring free primary and secondary education to all girls and boys, access to early childhood development and care and pre-primary education so they are ready for primary education. It also aims at diminishing gender inequalities and providing relevant skill knowledge, expand the number of scholarships, vocational training, communication technology, scientific programs in developed and developing countries.

The UNESCO states the reasons for the lack of quality education to be: the deficit of trained teachers, poor standards of schools and mainly absence of equal opportunity to both rural and urban children. Emphasizing on women and girls, it reports that one-third of the developing countries are not attaining gender parity in primary education. Focusing on Sub-Saharan Africa, it reports that the region accounts for the largest number of out-of-school children in the world. The collective international efforts have not only helped in lessening illiteracy rates from 40% to 22% in  Sub-Saharan Africa  and from 20% to 6% in  Asia, but have helped create a level playing field for all populations, including the remotest areas.

As quoted by  Mahatma Gandhi,  “Literacy in itself is no education. Literacy is not the end of education or even the beginning. By education I mean an all-round drawing out of the best in the child and man-body, mind and spirit.” Defined on these lines, it is believed literacy is the sole key to the overall development of an individual, which helps them evolve to the best of their potential. It helps attain equality, and break free from the vicious cycle of poverty, further empowering them to live a healthy sustainable life. The ultimate aim of world peace can also be achieved by enhancing literacy levels and by the achievement of other Sustainable Development Goals.

The below lying table depicts the literacy rates around the world:

Country

Adult literacy rate,  population 15+ years, both sexes (%)

Year

Afghanistan

31.74112

2011

Åland Islands

97.24697

2012

Albania

100

2016

Algeria

66.03011

2014

American Samoa

98.09

2015

Andorra

99.74441

2011

Azerbaijan

99.79006

2016

Bangladesh

72.75872

2016

Benin

32.94882

2012

Bhutan

57.0336

2012

Bolivia

92.45508

2015

Bosnia and Herzegovina

96.99177

2013

Brazil

91.72943

2014

Brunei Darussalam

96.08556

2011

Bulgaria

98.35245

2011

Burkina Faso

34.5994

2014

Burundi

61.56973

2014

Cabo Verde

86.79029

2015

Chad

22.31155

2016

Chile

96.26706

2013

Macao

96.53849

2016

Colombia

94.24505

2015

Comoros

49.19614

2012

Congo

79.31117

2011

Costa Rica

97.40658

2011

Côte d’Ivoire

43.90842

2014

Croatia

99.12536

2011

Cuba

99.75253

2012

Cyprus

98.67843

2011

North Korea

77.04268

2016

Dominican Republic

91.99121

2015

Ecuador

94.35023

2016

Egypt

75.06073

2013

El Salvador

87.96985

2015

Estonia

99.88579

2011

Gabon

82.2838

2012

Gambia

41.95005

2013

Georgia

99.58619

2014

Greece

97.12875

2011

Greenland

100

2015

Guatemala

81.2859

2014

Guinea

32.00386

2014

Guinea-Bissau

45.58116

2014

Guyana

85.63973

2014

Honduras

88.98748

2016

India

69.30256

2011

Indonesia

95.37697

2016

Iran

84.70524

2014

Iraq

43.68328

2013

Italy

98.84828

2011

Jordan

97.89032

2012

Kenya

78.73304

2014

Kuwait

95.68545

2015

Laos

58.28794

2011

Latvia

99.8959

2011

Lesotho

76.6352

2014

Lithuania

99.8156

2011

Madagascar

71.57262

2012

Malawi

62.14354

2015

Maldives

98.61012

2014

Mali

33.06889

2015

Malta

93.30736

2011

Marshall Islands

98.26508

2011

Mauritius

93.30736

2015

Mexico

98.26508

2015

Montenegro

98.44221

2011

Morocco

69.42539

2012

Myanmar

75.5512

2016

Namibia

88.27463

2011

Nepal

59.62725

2011

Niger

15.4567

2012

Oman

93.03861

2015

Pakistan

56.97715

2014

Palau

96.59374

2015

Palestine

96.93023

2016

Paraguay

95.0727

2015

Peru

94.17367

2016

Philippines

96.398

2013

Portugal

94.47705

2011

Qatar

97.74669

2014

Moldova

99.13831

2012

Romania

98.60429

2011

Rwanda

68.33103

2012

Samoa

98.97326

2011

Sao Tome and Principe

90.1431

2012

Saudi Arabia

94.42634

2013

Senegal

42.8175

2013

Serbia

98.84151

2016

Sierra Leone

32.42617

2013

Singapore

97.04959

2016

South Africa

94.36792

2015

Spain

98.25051

2016

Suriname

92.86866

2012

Thailand

92.86831

2015

Togo

63.74562

2015

Tonga

99.38553

2011

Tunisia

79.03643

2014

Turkey

95.60142

2015

Ukraine

70.19822

2012

United Arab Emirates

99.97435

2012

Tanzania

77.88723

2015

Uruguay

98.52387

2015

Uzbekistan

99.98383

2015

Venezuela

97.12709

2016

Zimbabwe

88.69342

2014

Know more:

Related maps:

World Illiteracy Map
World Illiteracy Map
Asian Countries by Literacy Rate
Asian Countries by Literacy Rate

Recent Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

"By clicking OK or by using this Website, you consent to the use of cookies. Your personal data will be governed by Mapsofworld Privacy Policy and Terms."
OK