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In the world of cricket, one name that will be forever etched in the minds of the cricketers and the fans is Phil Hughes. He was an Australian cricketer who played both in Test and One-Day International cricket and also played domestic cricket for South Australia and Worcestershire. Hughes’ full name was Phillip Joel Hughes and he was born on 30 November 1988 in Macksville, New South Wales, Australia. This left handed batsman made his test debut at a young age of 20.

He was the first Australian batsman to score a century on his ODI cricket debut. He was also the youngest cricketer to make a century in both innings of a Test match. He was the recipient of such awards as the New South Wales Rising Star Award, Sheffield Shield Player of the Year: 2008/09, Bradman Young Cricketer of the Year: 2009 and Domestic Player of the Year: 2012/13.

Fate played a cruel role in the life of this young and promising cricketer when during a Sheffield Shield match between South Australia and New South Wales, Hughes was struck by a bouncer, from Sean Abbott, a New South Wales bowler. Hughes was wearing a helmet; unfortunately the ball struck an area just below his ear, which was not protected by the helmet. He collapsed immediately after and was eventually taken to St. Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney. He underwent surgery and was placed in a medically induced coma.

The injury is described as a vertebral artery dissection, which ultimately leads to subarachnoid haemorrhage. The ongoing match was abandoned after the incident. Hughes succumbed to his injuries two days later. He was just three days away from his 26th birthday. Test match between Pakistan and New Zealand was suspended so was the tour match between Cricket Australia XI and the Indian Cricket team.

Hughes funeral took place on 3 December 2014 at Macksville High School. His funeral service saw thousands of locals, prominent locals, and national sportsmen and also the Prime Minister of Australia, Tony Abbott.

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Reference:Wikipedia
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