Quantcast
Maps of World
Current, Credible, Consistent

Get Custom Mapping Quote +1 (408) 326-9371 | sales@mapsofworld.com

Search
World Map / Upcoming Elections / US Presidential election 2016 / US Election Updates / Vice presidential debate unlikely to sway Ohio voters

2016 Presidential Election
Updates
Date

US Election Updates - October 13, 2012

Vice presidential debate unlikely to sway Ohio voters

The vice presidential debate is unlikely to sway undecided voters in Ohio, a battleground state that could hold the key to victory in the November 6 election.

Democrats praised Vice President Joe Biden's sharp tongue and his aggressive manner in a debate performance expected to offset President Barack Obama’s weak performance in his own debate last week.

However, Republicans slammed Biden as unprofessional for smirking as his Republican rival Paul Ryan spoke and interrupting him.

Ryan, a Republican Wisconsin congressman, was comparatively composed in his first debate on the national stage.

Many were surprised to see Biden produce a gaffe-free debate performance.

Vice presidential debates rarely influence voters. A Gallup poll has found that none of the eight such debates from 1976 to 2008 have altered voters’ preferences.

Thursday's debate had increased pressure on Biden to help the Democrats recapture their momentum following Republican presidential hopeful Mitt Romney's surprisingly strong debate performance last week.

No Republican presidential candidate has ever won an election without winning Ohio.

Obama maintained his lead over Romney in the latest Ohio polls.

On Thursday, a poll by NBC/Wall Street Journal/Marist showed Obama leading 51 percent to 45 percent, while a Rasmussen poll had Obama 1 point ahead at 48 percent.

Early voting is already under way in the state and formed a large part of Obama's success in the 2008 election. Nearly a quarter of the 133 million people who voted that year had cast their ballots before Election Day.

According to previous polls, Democratic voters across several swing states are more likely than Republicans to vote ahead of time.