Koryaksky volcano at Kamchatka Peninsula

Koryaksky volcano at Kamchatka Peninsula

The Kamchatka Peninsula in the far east of Russia is a very active geothermal region, part of the Pacific Volcanic Ring, and is home to some 160 volcanoes, 29 of which are active. Some of the major volcanoes include Avachinsky, Mutnovsky, Kozelsky, and Gorely.

In addition to these volcanoes, the surrounding region of the peninsula is a vacation destination with plenty of natural beauty. Natural hot springs, black beaches, and an acid lake are a few of the effects of the volcanic activity in the region.

The abundant wildlife in Kamchatka includes fish and marine life, as well as many bears. Visitors to Kamchatka often take bear-watching excursions or helicopter tours over the landscape or enjoy various activities at Kamchatka volcanoes including salmon fishing, volcano climbing/skiing/heli-skiing, dogsled tours, big game hunting, hiking and acid lake water sports.

Dvuhyurtochnoe lake, circumvented on all sides by rough mountains, is one of the major breeding waters of the peninsula. About 120,000 to 150,000 sockeye salmon reach the lake to breed each year. Around 500 brown bears visit the lake for fishing before hibernation.

On your trip to the Kamchatka Volcanoes, you would need the following things: backpack or travelling bag, sleeping bag and sleeping mat, hiking or trekking boots, sneakers, personal care items, swimming accessories, anorak + lightweight down vest, sweater, raincoat, sunglasses, headgear, headlamp, gloves, telescopic stick, personal first aid kit, and spray for mosquitoes.

  • The largest active volcano in the Northern Hemisphere is called Klyuchevskaya Sopka, which towers 4,750 meters (15,584 feet) above sea level.
  • Nineteen of these volcanoes are considered the Volcanoes of Kamchatka, which has been declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Kamchatka peninsula is located in Far East Russia. The region’s largest city, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsk, is the second largest city in the world that can’t be reached by road. Visitors to Kamchatka must take a plane to Yelizovo (or possibly a boat). The region is also accessed via dogsleds rather than taxis in the winter.

Spring and autumn are the best seasons weather-wise in Kamchatka, though mosquitoes can be a problem in the summer. The tradeoff is warm enough temperatures to allow for swimming in Avacha Bay. Early summer offers the chance of seeing migrating animals, while the end of September offers a cultural experience with the autumn festival, Alhalalalai.

Nearby Attractions: Valley of the Geysers, and Kronotsky Nature Reserve.

16,328 total views, 31 views today