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Culture of Singapore





The culture of Singapore has evolved down the years since the island country itself represents a wonderful blend of cultures as diverse as Malay, Chinese, Indian, and European. Naturally, Singapore, which was once a fishing village under the British Empire, is a composite and cohesive portrait of various cultures.

The most striking part of Singapore culture is its rich ethnic multiplicity that has brought about a seamless diffusion in the way Singaporeans go about their everyday lives. As a result of the variegated backgrounds of Singaporeans, the country was originally divided into several ethnic areas such as Kampong Glam, Little India, and Chinatown. Now, however, these divisions no longer exist but traces of each individual culture remain in specific areas of Singapore.

Singapore religion
Residents of Singapore practice a whole range of religions, depending on their background or individual choice. The Chinese population in Singapore has a good number of Buddhists, Christians, and Catholics. The Malay population is predominantly Muslim, while the Indians in Singapore are largely Hindus. There are also a number of free-thinkers/atheists in Singapore and the country does not propagate any official religion. However, the country does uphold the values and ethical standards of Confucianism.

Singapore food
Known as one of the global food capitals, Singapore is legendary for the sheer diversity, richness, and creativity of its culinary scene. One of the main drivers behind the spurt in Singapore tourism is its popularity in terms of food. Some of the Singaporean dishes that have acquired a cult status are Bak kut teh, Nasi lemak, Satay, Hokkien mee, Laksa, and Rojak. Singapore food does not disappoint on the seafood front either. One can sample a mind-boggling array of dishes rustled up with oysters, squids, clams, crabs, stingrays, and almost every living aquatic creature! In terms of cuisine, Singapore offers Indian, Chinese, French, Thai, Spanish, Indonesian, and Italian, and Fusion food to its locals and the large number of tourists that visit Singapore each year.


The culture of Singapore has evolved down the years since the island country itself represents a wonderful blend of cultures as diverse as Malay, Chinese, Indian, and European. Naturally, Singapore, which was once a fishing village under the British Empire, is a composite and cohesive portrait of various cultures.

The most striking part of Singapore culture is its rich ethnic multiplicity that has brought about a seamless diffusion in the way Singaporeans go about their everyday lives. As a result of the variegated backgrounds of Singaporeans, the country was originally divided into several ethnic areas such as Kampong Glam, Little India, and Chinatown. Now, however, these divisions no longer exist but traces of each individual culture remain in specific areas of Singapore.

Singapore religion
Residents of Singapore practice a whole range of religions, depending on their background or individual choice. The Chinese population in Singapore has a good number of Buddhists, Christians, and Catholics. The Malay population is predominantly Muslim, while the Indians in Singapore are largely Hindus. There are also a number of free-thinkers/atheists in Singapore and the country does not propagate any official religion. However, the country does uphold the values and ethical standards of Confucianism.

Singapore food
Known as one of the global food capitals, Singapore is legendary for the sheer diversity, richness, and creativity of its culinary scene. One of the main drivers behind the spurt in Singapore tourism is its popularity in terms of food. Some of the Singaporean dishes that have acquired a cult status are Bak kut teh, Nasi lemak, Satay, Hokkien mee, Laksa, and Rojak. Singapore food does not disappoint on the seafood front either. One can sample a mind-boggling array of dishes rustled up with oysters, squids, clams, crabs, stingrays, and almost every living aquatic creature! In terms of cuisine, Singapore offers Indian, Chinese, French, Thai, Spanish, Indonesian, and Italian, and Fusion food to its locals and the large number of tourists that visit Singapore each year.


Singapore language
English, Malay, Mandarin, and Tamil are the official languages in Singapore, though English remains the most widely spoken since the various ethnic groups find it easier to communicate with each other in English. However, the dialect popularity known as 'Singlish' (a fascinating mix of English with dialects of Singapore thrown in for good measure) is being widely used in Singapore. Interestingly the colloquial English spoken in Singapore borrows heavily on Malay words!

Singapore tourist attractions
The Jurong Bird Park, Singapore Zoological Gardens, Singapore Crocodilarium, Night Safari, Insect Kingdom, Butterfly Park, National Museum, Air Force Museum, Mint Coin Gallery, Labrador Secret Tunnels, Stamps Gallery, Chinatown, Holland Village, Bukit Timah Nature Reserve, Chinese Garden, Japanese Garden, Fort Canning Park, East Coast Park, Marina South City Park, and Mount Faber are only some of the hundreds of places that the Singapore Tourism Board has managed to popularize across the world due to its determined and concerted efforts.

Singapore music
Singapore has always had a vibrant and exciting musical past. Singapore's folk music incorporates elements of Tamil, Chinese, and Malay sounds to produce a lovely amalgamation of sounds that is distinctly Singaporean!Special mention must be made of Esplanade - Theatres on the Bay, which is Singapore's main arts centre. Esplanade is now home to Singapore classical music, Singapore Symphony Orchestra, and several concerts that take place through the year.

The culture of Singapore is one of the richest in the world - a fact that becomes even more impressive and fascinating when one considers the recent history and small size of the country. The National Day Parade in Singapore encapsulates its entire culture and portrays the tremendous success that the nation has been able to attain, while retaining its essence.