Maps of World
Current, Credible, Consistent
World Map / Olympics / Trivia / Olympic Motto and Olympic Creed


Olympic Motto and Olympic Creed


The Olympic Motto - Citius, Altius, Fortius
A friend of Baron Pierre de Coubertin, Father Henri Martin Didon of the Dominican order, was principal of Arcueil College, near Paris. An energetic teacher, he used the discipline of sport as a powerful educational tool. One day, following an interschool athletics meeting, Didon ended his speech quoting three Latin words: Citius, Altius, Fortius (faster, higher, stronger).

Struck by the succinctness of this phrase, Baron Pierre de Coubertin made it the Olympic motto, pointing out that "Athletes need 'freedom of excess.' That is why we gave them this motto...a motto for people who dare to try to break records."

Because the Olympic Games are the international arena, watched by the entire world, where the spirit, mind, and body of athletes attempt break records and become the best in the world, the motto, Citius, Altius, Fortius - faster, higher, stronger is a fittin - g motto.

THE OLYMPIC CREED
Pierre de Coubertin got the idea for the phrase adopted as the Olympic Creed from a speech given by Bishop Ethelbert Talbot at a service for Olympic champions during the 1908 Olympic Games.

The Olympic Creed reads:
"The most important thing in the Olympic Games is not to win but to take part, just as the most important thing in life is not the triumph but the struggle. The essential thing is not to have conquered but to have fought well."

The creed and motto are meant to inspire the athletes to embrace the Olympic spirit and perform to the best of their abilities.



Looking for Expert Cartography / GIS Services?

Contact - Parminder Singh (+91- 9910492371 IST)

For all Mapping Needs and Business Queries

Contact - Antoine Maddox (+1 408 637 0064 PST)